Facts about “Late Talkers”

When caregivers start asking questions about their child’s language development and late talking, speech-language pathologists hear answers like this all. the. time. “Don’t worry – he will talk when he’s ready.” “She’s just a late talker, she will catch up.” “Boys talk later than girls, he’s fine.” “She’s just letting big brother talk for her.” […]

Pretend Play

Research indicates there are several risk factors for delayed language skills, developmental delays, and cognitive delays. One of the risk factors is decreased pretend play skills. Pretend play begins to develop around 12-18 months, but isn’t mastered until 3-5 years. What is pretend play? Children develop pretend play skills later, after functional play and constructional play […]

Hearing Loss: What parents should know

The ability to hear is extremely important for children when developing speech and language skills. An audiologist may provide evaluation and treatment of hearing loss, whereas a speech-language pathologist can offer treatment to improve speech/language in the presence of a hearing loss. Here’s what parents and caregivers should know about children’s hearing. How common is […]

Picky Eating

Selective eating, or “picky eating” can be very stressful for children unable to tolerate a wide variety of foods and for caregivers wanting to end the mealtime battles. If you have concerns about your child’s eating abilities, contact a speech-language pathologist (SLP) or talk to your pediatrician. A SLP is often included in the care […]

Speech & Language: What parents need to know

There’s so much information available to parents that it can sometimes be overwhelming, especially when you have concerns about your child. You may hear “children develop on their own time” or children “catch up” without therapy, but what does the research actually say? Here’s answered to some of the most common questions regarding speech and […]